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"I wanted movement and not a calm course of existence. I wanted excitement and danger and the chance to sacrifice myself for my love. I felt in myself a superabundance of energy which found no outlet in our quiet life."

- Leo Tolstoy, Family Happiness (via fyodors)

hanukkahlewinsky:

friend: “i can only bring one friend. wanna go?” 

me:

image

i’m in a shitty mood today
i wrote 4 pages in my journal and i still feel shitty
the shit just won’t stop coming out

lotusglitter:

Scenes like this— simple, honest, peaceful, nostalgic— are what I absolutely love about Studio Ghibli movies. There is such care and accuracy given to capturing everyday moments like this, that hearken back to childhood feelings of carefree curiosity and the quiet beauty of the natural world… it inspires me, so much. Personally, I treasure my little snapshot memories of lying back in car seats on summer days, with the wind dancing through my hair, watching the mountains and clouds slowly drift by, not a worry in the world. I don’t remember much of my childhood, but I can still relate on some deep level to these moments in the movies, illustrating some small yet universal feeling that words could never quite express as truthfully.

lotusglitter:

Scenes like this— simple, honest, peaceful, nostalgic— are what I absolutely love about Studio Ghibli movies. There is such care and accuracy given to capturing everyday moments like this, that hearken back to childhood feelings of carefree curiosity and the quiet beauty of the natural world… it inspires me, so much.
Personally, I treasure my little snapshot memories of lying back in car seats on summer days, with the wind dancing through my hair, watching the mountains and clouds slowly drift by, not a worry in the world. I don’t remember much of my childhood, but I can still relate on some deep level to these moments in the movies, illustrating some small yet universal feeling that words could never quite express as truthfully.

jesuisperdu:

Roland Sabatier, hypergraphic photograph, excerpt from the novel Gaffe au golf, 1964.
“Hypergraphy” is an artistic practice developed by the Lettrist avant-garde in the 1950′s. They defined it as “introducing into alphabetic writing not only the art of painting, but the graphics of all people or social categories past and present, as well as the graphics or anti-graphics of every individual imagination”.
By means of a timeline drawn by artist Roland Sabatier, the exhibition Rules of Hypergraphy– a project by Paul Gangloff, September 26 to October 5, Extrapool, Nijmegen – shows how the Lettrists situated hypergraphy within the history of writing and painting. It further assembles works by turntablist Marc Matter, (typo)graphic designer Karl Nawrot, graphic designers Our Polite Society and sound poet Jörg Piringer, each of them exemplifying uses of signs and letters that goes beyond writing.The accompanying publication works as a subtext for the exhibition. It provides further insight into the concept of hypergraphy, but also prolongs the investigation by taking a detour into the relation between the Lettrists and the punks.
[part of my ancestry] [via]

jesuisperdu:

Roland Sabatier, hypergraphic photograph, excerpt from the novel Gaffe au golf, 1964.

“Hypergraphy” is an artistic practice developed by the Lettrist avant-garde in the 1950′s. They defined it as “introducing into alphabetic writing not only the art of painting, but the graphics of all people or social categories past and present, as well as the graphics or anti-graphics of every individual imagination”.


By means of a timeline drawn by artist Roland Sabatier, the exhibition Rules of Hypergraphy– a project by Paul Gangloff, September 26 to October 5, Extrapool, Nijmegen – shows how the Lettrists situated hypergraphy within the history of writing and painting. It further assembles works by turntablist Marc Matter, (typo)graphic designer Karl Nawrot, graphic designers Our Polite Society and sound poet Jörg Piringer, each of them exemplifying uses of signs and letters that goes beyond writing.
The accompanying publication works as a subtext for the exhibition. It provides further insight into the concept of hypergraphy, but also prolongs the investigation by taking a detour into the relation between the Lettrists and the punks.

[part of my ancestry] [via]